Schooling Citizens

Author: Hilary J. Moss
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226542515
Release Date: 2010-04-15
Genre: Social Science

While white residents of antebellum Boston and New Haven forcefully opposed the education of black residents, their counterparts in slaveholding Baltimore did little to resist the establishment of African American schools. Such discrepancies, Hilary Moss argues, suggest that white opposition to black education was not a foregone conclusion. Through the comparative lenses of these three cities, she shows why opposition erupted where it did across the United States during the same period that gave rise to public education. As common schooling emerged in the 1830s, providing white children of all classes and ethnicities with the opportunity to become full-fledged citizens, it redefined citizenship as synonymous with whiteness. This link between school and American identity, Moss argues, increased white hostility to black education at the same time that it spurred African Americans to demand public schooling as a means of securing status as full and equal members of society. Shedding new light on the efforts of black Americans to learn independently in the face of white attempts to withhold opportunity, Schooling Citizens narrates a previously untold chapter in the thorny history of America’s educational inequality.

The World of Antebellum America A Daily Life Encyclopedia 2 volumes

Author: Alexandra Kindell
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9781440837111
Release Date: 2018-09-30
Genre: History

This set provides insight into the lives of ordinary Americans free and enslaved, in farms and cities, in the North and the South, who lived during the years of 1815 to 1860. • Provides intimate details about the personal lives of Americans during the Antebellum Era • Demonstrates the diversity of the American experience in the years before the Civil War • Makes clear how hard Americans worked to build their lives while still participating in the democratic process • Explores how Americans dealt with the daily demands of life as national and regional issues created insecurity and instability • Includes 40 primary source documents with detailed introductions to realize Antebellum America

Education and Social Change

Author: John L. Rury
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781317497356
Release Date: 2015-07-24
Genre: Education

This brief, interpretive history of American schooling focuses on the evolving relationship between education and social change. Like its predecessors, this new edition adopts a thematic approach, investigating the impact of social forces such as industrialization, urbanization, immigration, globalization, and cultural conflict on the development of schools and other educational institutions. It also examines the various ways that schools have contributed to social change, particularly in enhancing the status and accomplishments of certain social groups and not others. Detailed accounts of the experiences of women and minority groups in American history consider how their lives have been affected by education, while "Focal Point" sections within each chapter allow the reader to hone in on key moments in history and their relevance within the broader scope of American schooling from the colonial era to the present. This new edition has been comprehensively updated and edited for greater readability and clarity. It offers a revised final chapter, updated to include recent change in education politics and policy, in particular the decline of No Child Left Behind and the impact of the Common Core and movements against it. Further additions include enhanced coverage of colonial and early post-colonial American schooling, added materials on persistent issues such as race in education, an updated discussion of the GED program, and a closer look at the role of technology in schools. With its nuanced treatment of both historical and contemporary factors influencing the modern school system, this book remains an excellent resource for investigating and critiquing the social, economic, and cultural development of American education.

Moral Minorities and the Making of American Democracy

Author: Kyle G. Volk
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199371938
Release Date: 2014-06-16
Genre: History

Should the majority always rule? If not, how should the rights of minorities be protected? In Moral Minorities and the Making of American Democracy, Kyle G. Volk unearths the origins of modern ideas and practices of minority-rights politics. Focusing on controversies spurred by the explosion of grassroots moral reform in the early nineteenth century, he shows how a motley but powerful array of self-understood minorities reshaped American democracy as they battled laws regulating Sabbath observance, alcohol, and interracial contact. Proponents justified these measures with the "democratic" axiom of majority rule. In response, immigrants, black northerners, abolitionists, liquor dealers, Catholics, Jews, Seventh-day Baptists, and others articulated a different vision of democracy requiring the protection of minority rights. These moral minorities prompted a generation of Americans to reassess whether "majority rule" was truly the essence of democracy, and they ensured that majority tyranny would no longer be just the fear of elites and slaveholders. Beginning in the mid-nineteenth-century, minority rights became the concern of a wide range of Americans attempting to live in an increasingly diverse nation. Volk reveals that driving this vast ideological reckoning was the emergence of America's tradition of popular minority-rights politics. To challenge hostile laws and policies, moral minorities worked outside of political parties and at the grassroots. They mobilized elite and ordinary people to form networks of dissent and some of America's first associations dedicated to the protection of minority rights. They lobbied officials and used constitutions and the common law to initiate "test cases" before local and appellate courts. Indeed, the moral minorities of the mid-nineteenth century pioneered fundamental methods of political participation and legal advocacy that subsequent generations of civil-rights and civil-liberties activists would adopt and that are widely used today.

The Role of Female Seminaries on the Road to Social Justice for Women

Author: Kristen Welch
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 9781630877507
Release Date: 2015-01-12
Genre: History

In the United States, female seminaries and their antecedents, the female academies, were crucial first institutions that played a vital role in liberating women from the "home sphere," a locus that was the primary domain of Euro-American women. The female seminaries founded by Native Americans and African Americans had different founding rationales but also played a key role in empowering women. On the whole, the initial intent of these schools was to prepare women for their proper role in American society as wives and mothers. An unintended effect, however, was to prepare women for the first socially accepted profession for women: teaching. Thus equipped, women played a crucial role in the development of American education at all levels while achieving varying degrees of social justice for themselves and other groups through engagement in the reform movements of their times--including women's suffrage, abolition, temperance, and mental health reform. By recapturing the role religion played in shaping education for women, Welch and Ruelas offer a refreshing take on history that draws on several primary texts and details more than one hundred female seminaries and academies opened in the United States.

Twelve Years a Slave

Author: Solomon Northup
Publisher: Piper Verlag
ISBN: 9783492967082
Release Date: 2014-02-17
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Solomon Northup war ein freier Bürger, bis er von Sklavenhändlern verschleppt und an einen Plantagenbesitzer verkauft wurde. Dort lebte er zwölf Jahre als Sklave, bis er schließlich – als einer der wenigen – seine Freiheit zurückerlangen und zu seiner Familie zurückkehren konnte. Die gleichnamige Verfilmung seiner Memoiren von Regisseur Steve McQueen hat bei der Verleihung der Golden Globes den Hauptpreis als bestes Filmdrama gewonnen.

The African American Years

Author: Gabriel Stepto
Publisher: Charles Scribner's Sons
ISBN: UCSC:32106017367100
Release Date: 2003
Genre: History

Discusses the history of African Americans from pre-colonial times to the present. Includes memoirs, letters, family histories, newspapers, oral histories, and city directories, providing historical evidence to help understand and interpret past events. For high school and college students, as well as general readers.