School Lunch Politics

Author: Susan Levine
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400841486
Release Date: 2011-11-21
Genre: History

Whether kids love or hate the food served there, the American school lunchroom is the stage for one of the most popular yet flawed social welfare programs in our nation's history. School Lunch Politics covers this complex and fascinating part of American culture, from its origins in early twentieth-century nutrition science, through the establishment of the National School Lunch Program in 1946, to the transformation of school meals into a poverty program during the 1970s and 1980s. Susan Levine investigates the politics and culture of food; most specifically, who decides what American children should be eating, what policies develop from those decisions, and how these policies might be better implemented. Even now, the school lunch program remains problematic, a juggling act between modern beliefs about food, nutrition science, and public welfare. Levine points to the program menus' dependence on agricultural surplus commodities more than on children's nutritional needs, and she discusses the political policy barriers that have limited the number of children receiving meals and which children were served. But she also shows why the school lunch program has outlasted almost every other twentieth-century federal welfare initiative. In the midst of privatization, federal budget cuts, and suspect nutritional guidelines where even ketchup might be categorized as a vegetable, the program remains popular and feeds children who would otherwise go hungry. As politicians and the media talk about a national obesity epidemic, School Lunch Politics is a timely arrival to the food policy debates shaping American health, welfare, and equality. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Free for All

Author: Janet Poppendieck
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520269880
Release Date: 2011-01-10
Genre: Social Science

As this book takes us on an eye-opening journey into the nation's school kitchens, the author offers an assessment of school food in the United States. She reveals the forces that determine how lunch is served, such as the financial troubles of schools, the commercialization of childhood, and the reliance on market models. The author explores the deep politics of food provision from multiple perspectives including history, policy, nutrition, environmental sustainability, taste, and more. How did our children end up eating nachos, pizza, and Tater Tots for lunch? How did we get into the absurd situation in which nutritionally regulated meals compete with fast food items and snack foods loaded with sugar, salt, and fat? What is the nutritional profile of the federal meals? How well are they reaching students who need them? Opening a window onto our culture as a whole, she concludes with a vision for change: fresh, healthy food for all children as a regular part of their school day.

Closing the Food Gap

Author: Mark Winne
Publisher: Beacon Press
ISBN: 9780807047316
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Health & Fitness

From the War on Poverty to new farmers' markets, a food expert tackles America's dangerous dietary split With a new Foreword Closing the Food Gap exposes America's dangerous dietary split: from patrons of food pantries, bodegas, and convenience stores to the more comfortable classes who increasingly seek out organic and local products. Calling largely on his own experience in food activism, and mixing in surprisingly witty observations, Mark Winne ultimately envisions realistic partnerships in which family farms and impoverished communities come together to get healthy, locally produced food onto everyone's table.

The Shifting Grounds of Race

Author: Scott Kurashige
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400834007
Release Date: 2010-03-15
Genre: History

Los Angeles has attracted intense attention as a "world city" characterized by multiculturalism and globalization. Yet, little is known about the historical transformation of a place whose leaders proudly proclaimed themselves white supremacists less than a century ago. In The Shifting Grounds of Race, Scott Kurashige highlights the role African Americans and Japanese Americans played in the social and political struggles that remade twentieth-century Los Angeles. Linking paradigmatic events like Japanese American internment and the Black civil rights movement, Kurashige transcends the usual "black/white" dichotomy to explore the multiethnic dimensions of segregation and integration. Racism and sprawl shaped the dominant image of Los Angeles as a "white city." But they simultaneously fostered a shared oppositional consciousness among Black and Japanese Americans living as neighbors within diverse urban communities. Kurashige demonstrates why African Americans and Japanese Americans joined forces in the battle against discrimination and why the trajectories of the two groups diverged. Connecting local developments to national and international concerns, he reveals how critical shifts in postwar politics were shaped by a multiracial discourse that promoted the acceptance of Japanese Americans as a "model minority" while binding African Americans to the social ills underlying the 1965 Watts Rebellion. Multicultural Los Angeles ultimately encompassed both the new prosperity arising from transpacific commerce and the enduring problem of race and class divisions. This extraordinarily ambitious book adds new depth and complexity to our understanding of the "urban crisis" and offers a window into America's multiethnic future.

The Oxford Handbook of U S Social Policy

Author: Daniel Béland
Publisher: Oxford Handbooks
ISBN: 9780199838509
Release Date: 2015
Genre: Political Science

This handbook provides a survey of the American welfare state. It offers an historical overview of U.S. social policy from the colonial era to the present, a discussion of available theoretical perspectives on it, an analysis of social programmes, and on overview of the U.S. welfare state's consequences for poverty, inequality, and citizenship.

Feeding the Future

Author: Jennifer Geist Rutledge
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813573335
Release Date: 2016-05-11
Genre: Political Science

A century ago, only local charities existed to feed children. Today 368 million children receive school lunches in 151 countries, in programs supported by state and national governments. In Feeding the Future, Jennifer Geist Rutledge investigates how and why states have assumed responsibility for feeding children, chronicling the origins and spread of school lunch programs around the world, starting with the adoption of these programs in the United States and some Western European nations, and then tracing their growth through the efforts of the World Food Program. The primary focus of Feeding the Future is on social policy formation: how and why did school lunch programs emerge? Given that all countries developed education systems, why do some countries have these programs and others do not? Rutledge draws on a wealth of information—including archival resources, interviews with national policymakers in several countries, United Nations data, and agricultural statistics—to underscore the ways in which a combination of ideological and material factors led to the creation of these enduringly popular policies. She shows that, in many ways, these programs emerged largely as an unintended effect of agricultural policy that rewarded farmers for producing surpluses. School lunches provided a ready outlet for this surplus. She also describes how, in each of the cases of school lunch creation, policy entrepreneurs, motivated by a commitment to alleviate childhood malnutrition, harnessed different ideas that were relevant to their state or organization in order to funnel these agricultural surpluses into school lunch programs. The public debate over how we feed our children is becoming more and more politically charged. Feeding the Future provides vital background to these debates, illuminating the history of food policies and the ways our food system is shaped by global social policy.

Living for the City

Author: Donna Jean Murch
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9780807895856
Release Date: 2010-10-04
Genre: Social Science

In this nuanced and groundbreaking history, Donna Murch argues that the Black Panther Party (BPP) started with a study group. Drawing on oral history and untapped archival sources, she explains how a relatively small city with a recent history of African American settlement produced such compelling and influential forms of Black Power politics. During an era of expansion and political struggle in California's system of public higher education, black southern migrants formed the BPP. In the early 1960s, attending Merritt College and other public universities radicalized Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, and many of the young people who joined the Panthers' rank and file. In the face of social crisis and police violence, the most disfranchised sectors of the East Bay's African American community--young, poor, and migrant--challenged the legitimacy of state authorities and of an older generation of black leadership. By excavating this hidden history, Living for the City broadens the scholarship of the Black Power movement by documenting the contributions of black students and youth who created new forms of organization, grassroots mobilization, and political literacy.

Baby Bites

Author: Bridget Swinney, MS, RD
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781451620221
Release Date: 2011-01-18
Genre: Cooking

This book helps parents with everything they need to know about feeding babies during the first three years--including breastfeeding, bottle-feeding, puréed baby food, teething foods, and solids--making it the most comprehensive baby nutrition book on the market. It helps parents understand their baby's nutritional needs and enables them to prepare tasty food so their baby can develop healthy eating habits. It's part nutrition book, part cookbook, and a complete godsend for parents. Baby Bites is an iParenting Excellent Parenting Product Award winner! This book helps parents with everything they need to know about feeding babies during the first three years--including breastfeeding, bottle-feeding, puréed baby food, teething foods, and solids--making it the most comprehensive baby nutrition book on the market. It helps parents understand their baby's nutritional needs and enables them to prepare tasty food so their baby can develop healthy eating habits. It's part nutrition book, part cookbook, and a complete godsend for parents. Baby Bites is an iParenting Excellent Parenting Product Award winner!

To Promote the General Welfare

Author: Steven Conn
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199986743
Release Date: 2012-08-02
Genre: History

Americans love to hate their government, and a long tradition of anti-government suspicion reaches back to debates among the founders of the nation. But the election of Barack Obama has created a backlash rivaled only by the anti-government hysteria that preceded the Civil War. Lost in all the Tea Party rage and rhetoric is this simple fact: the federal government plays a central role in making our society function, and it always has. Edited by Steven Conn and written by some of America's leading scholars, the essays in To Promote the General Welfare explore the many ways government programs have improved the quality of life in America. The essays cover everything from education, communication, and transportation to arts and culture, housing, finance, and public health. They explore how and why government programs originated, how they have worked and changed--and been challenged--since their inception, and why many of them are important to preserve. The book shows how the WPA provided vital, in some cases career-saving, assistance to artists and writers like Jackson Pollock, Dorothea Lange, Richard Wright, John Cheever, and scores of others; how millions of students from diverse backgrounds have benefited and continue to benefit from the G.I. Bill, Fulbright scholarships, and federally insured student loans; and how the federal government created an Interstate highway system unparalleled in the world, linking the entire nation. These are just a few examples of highly successful programs the book celebrates--and that anti-government critics typically ignore. For anyone wishing to explore the flip side of today's vehement attacks on American government, To Promote the General Welfare is the best place to start.

Uncontrolled

Author: Jim Manzi
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 9780465029310
Release Date: 2012-05-01
Genre: Political Science

Entrepreneur and political commentator Jim Manzi argues for a radical new approach to our most pressing economic and social problems, using the scientific method--and its controlled experiments and skeptical mindset--to test what works in business and gover

Stand Together or Starve Alone Unity and Chaos in the U S Food Movement

Author: Mark Winne
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9781440844485
Release Date: 2017-11-30
Genre: Political Science

America has a perplexing, multifaceted problem that combines hunger, obesity, and unhealthy food. This book examines how this situation was created and shows how people working together can resolve this longstanding issue. • Taps the available evidence and interviews with some of the nation's leading food activists and academics to unveil compelling strategies to end hunger and reduce obesity • Explains why the problems of obesity and food insecurity persist despite attention, organizations, and agencies focused on these pervasive problems • Demonstrates how the solutions to America's food problems lie not in more money and programs but in the coordination of people working together constructively and creatively

Lunch Wars

Author: Amy Kalafa
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101547465
Release Date: 2011-08-18
Genre: Health & Fitness

There's a battle going on in school lunchrooms around the country...and it's a battle our children can't afford for us to lose. The average kid will eat 4,000 school lunches between kindergarten and twelfth grade. But what exactly are kids eating in school lunchrooms around the country? Many parents don't quite know what their children are eating-or where it came from. As award-winning filmmaker and nutritionist Amy Kalafa discovered in researching her documentary film Two Angry Moms: Fighting for the Health of America's Children, these days it's pretty rare to find a piece of fresh fruit in your average school lunchroom amid all the chips, french fries, Pop-Tarts, chicken nuggets, and soda that's being served. But what, if anything, can parents do about it? Written in response to the onslaught of requests she received from parents who saw her film and asked, "If I want to attempt to change the food culture in my kid's school, how on earth should I get started?!" this empowering book arms parents with the specific information and tools they need to get unhealthy-even dangerous-food out of their children's school cafeteria and to hold their schools and local and national governments accountable for ensuring that their growing children are served healthy meals at school. In Lunch Wars, Kalafa explains all the complicated issues surrounding school food; how to work with your school's "Wellness Policy"; the basics of self- operated vs. outsourced cafeterias; how to get funding for a school garden, and much more. Lunch Wars also features the inspiring stories of parents around the country who have fought for better school food and have won, as well as details Amy's quest to spark a revolution in her own school district. For the future health and well-being of our children, the time has come for a school food revolution.

Hellfire Nation

Author: James A. Morone
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300105179
Release Date: 2004-07-01
Genre: Political Science

Annotation Although the US is proud of being a secular state, religion lies at the heart of American politics. This volume looks at how the country came to have the soul of a church & the consequences - the moral crusades against slavery, alcohol, witchcraft & discrimination that time & again have prevailed upon the nation.

American Dream

Author: Jason DeParle
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143034375
Release Date: 2005
Genre: Political Science

Provides an in-depth study of the conflict between government social policy and the realities of life in post-welfare America, focusing on the lives of three women in a single extended family.

The Sympathetic State

Author: Michele Landis Dauber
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226923482
Release Date: 2012-11-30
Genre: History

Drawing on a variety of materials, including newspapers, legal briefs, political speeches, the art and literature of the time, and letters from thousands of ordinary Americans, Dauber shows that while this long history of government disaster relief has faded from our memory today, it was extremely well known to advocates for an expanded role for the national government in the 1930s, including the Social Security Act. Making this connection required framing the Great Depression as a disaster afflicting citizens though no fault of their own. Dauber argues that the disaster paradigm, though successful in defending the New Deal, would ultimately come back to haunt advocates for social welfare. By not making a more radical case for relief, proponents of the New Deal helped create the weak, uniquely American welfare state we have today - one torn between the desire to come to the aid of those suffering and the deeply rooted suspicion that those in need are responsible for their own deprivation.