Rails in Rochester and Monroe County

Author: Richard "Dick" Chait
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9781467134378
Release Date: 2015
Genre: History

From photography to farming and from medicine to music, Rochester and the county in which it resides, Monroe County, are known throughout the world. This book brings to life the role that rail transportation had in developing an economy that made these contributions possible. By 1900, some of the county's biggest railroads had been drawn to the Rochester and Monroe County markets. They attracted people and businesses to the area and ensured the flow of products to the marketplace. Trolleys enabled people to commute to and from work as well as to enjoy the recreational resources of Lake Ontario and Irondequoit Bay. Rail transportation helped make Rochester and Monroe County truly great places to live and work.

Rochester s 19th Ward

Author: Michael Leavy
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738539473
Release Date: 2005
Genre: History

Rochester's 19th Ward portrays one of the city's largest residential neighborhoods. The initial settlement, predating Rochester itself, was called Castle Town. It emerged around 1800 along the Genesee River, where boatmen poled flat-bottomed boats along a stretch of turbulence in the river known as the Rapids. Out of this desolate community developed a streetcar suburb, an elegant and vibrant neighborhood, designed for the modern 20th-century family. Fine homes, churches, shops, schools, and industries arose between 1900 and 1930, and the 19th Ward quickly became a prestigious address for doctors, professors, and skilled laborers.

Rochester s Transportation Heritage

Author: Donovan A. Shilling
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 073851330X
Release Date: 2003
Genre: History

A city's rich transportation history comes alive in Rochester's Transportation Heritage. Here, the evolution of transportation in Rochester is documented in vintage images from the 1890s through the 1950s. Included are photographs of Charles Lindbergh's visit to Rochester; images of the earliest locomotives and grand railroad stations; a picture of a trotting mare racing a lady bicyclist at the old Driving Park racetrack; views of boats on the Erie Canal; and shots of the city's first airplanes. Rochester's Transportation Heritage revives the horse-drawn trolley car days and the lost subway era. Rare images of the Regas auto and the cars that were destroyed by Rochester's 1932 tornado complete the story.

Buffalo Railroads

Author: Stephen G. Myers
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9781439623992
Release Date: 2011-02-14
Genre: Transportation

As a growing city on Lake Erie, Buffalo was considered the second largest railroad hub in the Unites States. Given its location, it saw the effects of westward expansion as the country grew and greatly benefited as a result. Buffalo rapidly became a city of importance as the stockyards, grain, steel, automotive, and other industries began to establish themselves in the area. Drawn by vast amounts of freshwater, inexpensive hydropower, and excellent means of transportation, the Buffalo region grew, and with it, the railroads expanded to support the area and help a young nation prosper. Buffalo earned the name of the Queen City as it became the second-largest city in the state of New York, and it was the railroad that brought the city to prominence.

Delaware and Hudson Railway

Author: Marilyn E. Dufresne
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738573906
Release Date: 2010-12
Genre: Transportation

The Delaware and Hudson Railway has a grand and glorious history that began in the coal mines of Pennsylvania. The Delaware and Hudson Canal; Gravity Railroad; the Stourbridge Lion, the first locomotive in America in 1829; and the Albany and Susquehanna Railroad provided the necessary stepping stones for successfully transporting anthracite by rail to New York State. In 1906, the massive roundhouse was built in Oneonta during the glory days of steam power, and in 1931, the company became known as the Delaware and Hudson Railway. Today the railroad serves as a "bridge line," providing an important link in moving heavy freight. Delaware and Hudson Railway enlightens rail fans with historic photographs and rekindles the nostalgia for the great railroad era.

The Electric Interurban Railways in America

Author: George Woodman Hilton
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804740143
Release Date: 2000-01-01
Genre: Transportation

One of the most colorful yet neglected eras in American transportation history is re-created in this definitive history of the electric interurbans. Built with the idea of attracting short-distance passenger traffic and light freight, the interurbans were largely constructed in the early 1900s. The rise of the automobile and motor transport caused the industry to decline after World War I, and the depression virtually annihilated the industry by the middle 1930s. Part I describes interurban construction, technology, passenger and freight traffic, financial history, and final decline and abandonment. Part II presents individual histories (with route maps) of the more than 300 companies of the interurban industry. Reviews "A first-rate work of such detail and discernment that it might well serve as a model for all corporate biographies. . . . A wonderfully capable job of distillation." —Trains "Few economic, social, and business historians can afford to miss this definitive study." —Mississippi Valley Historical Review "All seekers after nostalgia will be interested in this encyclopedic volume on the days when the clang, clang of the trolley was the most exciting travel sound the suburbs knew." —Harper's Magazine "A fascinating and instructive chapter in the history of American transportation." —Journal of Economic History "The hint that behind the grand facade of scholarship lies an expanse of boyish enthusiasm is strengthened by a lovingly amassed and beautifully reproduced collection of 37 photographs." —The Nation

The New York Central System

Author: Michael Leavy
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9780738549286
Release Date: 2006
Genre: History

A full generation has passed since a New York Central emblem dashed across the countryside on a railroad car, but few could ever forget "the greatest railroad in the world." The New York Central System grew from an amalgamation of smaller lines stretching from Albany to Buffalo in the 1830s. Twenty years later, the lines were gathered into a single company. Its phenomenal success did not go unnoticed by Cornelius "the Commodore" Vanderbilt. In his late sixties, when most men retire, he methodically started acquiring railroads in the New York City and Hudson River region. He then acquired the New York Central and merged it with his Hudson River Railroad. The Commodore and his son William, the foremost rail barons of their age, forged ahead with one of the most dynamic future-directed endeavors in the world-a railroad empire that traversed 11 states and 2 Canadian provinces.

Railroad Wars of New York State

Author: Timothy Starr
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 9781614235927
Release Date: 2012-07-24
Genre: Transportation

New York's railroads were born of the cutthroat conflict of rate wars, bloody strikes and even federal graft. The railroad wars began as soon as the first line was chartered between Albany and Schenectady when supporters of the Erie Canal tried to block the new technology that would render their waterway obsolete. After the first primitive railroads overcame that hurdle, they began battling with one another in a series of rate wars to gain market share. Attracted by the success of the rails, the most powerful and cunning capitalists in the country--Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jay Gould, Daniel Drew and other robber barons--joined the fray. Timothy Starr's account of New York's railroad wars steams through the nineteenth century with stories of rate pools, labor strikes, stock corners, legislative bribery and treasury plundering the likes of which the world had never seen.

Street Smart

Author: Samuel I. Schwartz
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 9781610395656
Release Date: 2015-08-18
Genre: Political Science

With wit and sharp insight, former Traffic Commissioner of New York City, Sam Schwartz a.k.a. “Gridlock Sam,” one of the most respected transportation engineers in the world and consummate insider in NYC political circles, uncovers how American cities became so beholden to cars and why the current shift away from that trend will forever alter America's urban landscapes, marking nothing short of a revolution in how we get from place to place. When Sam Schwartz was growing up in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn—his block belonged to his community: the kids who played punchball and stickball & their parents, who'd regularly walk to the local businesses at which they also worked. He didn't realize it then, but Bensonhurst was already more like a museum of a long-forgotten way-of-life than a picture of America's future. Public transit traveled over and under city streets—New York's first subway line opened in 1904—but the streets themselves had been conquered by the internal combustion engine. America's dependency on the automobile began with the 1908 introduction of Henry Ford's car-for-everyone, the Model T. The “battle for right-of-way” in the 1920s saw the demise of streetcars and transformed America's streets from a multiuse resource for socializing, commerce, and public mobility into exclusive arteries for private automobiles. The subsequent destruction of urban transit systems and post WWII suburbanization of America enabled by the Interstate Highway System and the GI Bill forever changed the way Americans commuted. But today, for the first time in history, and after a hundred years of steady increase, automobile driving is in decline. Younger Americans increasingly prefer active transportation choices like walking or cycling and taking public transit, ride-shares or taxis. This isn't a consequence of higher gas prices, or even the economic downturn, but rather a collective decision to be a lot less dependent on cars—and if American cities want to keep their younger populations, they need to plan accordingly. In Street Smart, Sam Schwartz explains how. In this clear and erudite presentation of the principles of smart transportation and sustainable urban planning—from the simplest cobblestoned street to the brave new world of driverless cars and trains—Sam Schwartz combines rigorous historical scholarship with the personal and entertaining recollections of a man who has spent more than forty years working on planning intelligent transit networks in New York City. Street Smart is a book for everyone who wants to know more about the who, what, when, where, and why of human mobility.

Bill Miller s Riviera

Author: Tom Austin
Publisher: History Press (SC)
ISBN: 1609494563
Release Date: 2011
Genre: History

Where did Frank Sinatra, Mickey Mantle, Sugar Ray Robinson, Joan Crawford and hundreds of other A-listers along with mobsters like Meyer Lansky eat, drink and dance? It wasn't in Hollywood or at the Copacabana but at Bill Miller's Riviera in Fort Lee. The Riviera's breathtaking views of New York, its stunning showgirls and its gambling hall drew the famous and infamous to its tables. After it was originally run as a speakeasy by Ben Marden during the 1920s, Bill Miller, a Russian Jewish immigrant, attracted the most sought-after performers and turned it into one of the most popular nightclubs during the 1940s and 1950s. Relive Bill Miller's Riviera and experience the excitement of his lucky patrons.

Rochester Through Time

Author: Mary Hasek Grenier
Publisher:
ISBN: 163500022X
Release Date: 2015
Genre: History

"Rochester is a waterborne city. The beauty and potential power of the Genesee River's Upper and Lower Falls drew co-founders Nathaniel Rochester, William Fitzhugh and Charles Carroll to this Seneca-inhabited region in the early 1800s. The two falls spurred local industrial development, while the addition of the Erie Canal in 1825 connected the nascent village to cities across the country and expanded its market, making Rochester one of America's first boom towns.Established as a city in 1834, Rochester has since reinvented itself on a number of occasions, earning a series of reputations ranging from the "Flour City" to the "World Image Center."Mary Hasek Grenier and Emily C. Morry, PhD, both graduates of the University of Rochester, in collaboration with the Office of the City Historian, have compiled a unique visual documentation of Rochester's evolution. Rochester Through Time highlights the natural resources that shaped the city's founding, the historic figures who influenced its development and the resourceful residents who point toward the promise of its future."