Notes from the C vennes

Author: Adam Thorpe
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 9781472951311
Release Date: 2018-05-03
Genre: Nature

Adam Thorpe's home for the past 25 years has been an old house in the Cévennes, a wild range of mountains in southern France. Prior to this, in an ancient millhouse in the oxbow of a Cévenol river, he wrote the novel that would become the Booker Prize-nominated Ulverton, now a Vintage Classic. In more recent writing Thorpe has explored the Cévennes, drawing on the legends, history and above all the people of this part of France for his inspiration. In his charming journal, Notes from the Cévennes, Thorpe takes up these themes, writing about his surroundings, the village and his house at the heart of it, as well as the contrasts of city life in nearby Nîmes. In particular he is interested in how the past leaves impressions – marks – on our landscape and on us. What do we find in the grass, earth and stone beneath our feet and in the objects around us? How do they tie us to our forebears? What traces have been left behind and what marks do we leave now? He finds a fossil imprinted in the single worked stone of his house's front doorstep, explores the attic once used as a silk factory and contemplates the stamp of a chance paw in a fragment of Roman roof-tile. Elsewhere, he ponders mutilated fleur-de-lys (French royalist symbols) in his study door and unwittingly uses the tomb-rail of two sisters buried in the garden as a gazebo. Then there are the personal fragments that make up a life and a family history: memories dredged up by 'dusty toys, dried-up poster paints, a painted clay lump in the bottom of a box.' Part celebration of both rustic and urban France, part memoir, Thorpe's humorous and precise prose shows a wonderful stylist at work, recalling classics such as Robert Louis Stevenson's Travels with a Donkey in the Cévennes.

The Cevennes Journal

Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 9781780576879
Release Date: 2014-07-03
Genre: Literary Collections

'For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move.' - RLS In September 1878, Robert Louis Stevenson travelled by donkey through the Cevennes region of France. For personal memory - and, as it happens, for literary posterity - the young Stevenson recorded copious notes on his journey as he travelled. Some of these witty and incisive impressions were subsequently published in Travels With A Donkey. The remainder, however, didn't find its way into print until the first publication of The Cevennes Journal in 1978, one hundred years later. This travelogue, which also includes several of Stevenson's previously unpublished sketches of the region, provides both a unique socio-historical document and an important piece of literature.

Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes and Selected Travel Writings

Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: UOM:39015029239681
Release Date: 1992
Genre: Travel

This volume of Stevenson's travel writings includes his first published book "An Island Voyage" (1878) - a vivid account of a canoe voyage in Belgium and France in two sail-powered skiffs, named "Cigarette" and "Arethusa" - and Stevenson's popular description of a tour with his recalcitrant donkey Modestine, "Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes" (1879). Stevenson's natural affinity for France, his appreciation of its landscape, and his enthusiasm for the French way of life are borne out by these works.

TRAVELS WITH A DONKEY IN THE CEVENNES

Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
Publisher: 右灰文化傳播有限公司可提供下載列印
ISBN:
Release Date: 2017-04-19
Genre: Cévennes Mountains (France)

IN a little place called Le Monastier, in a pleasant highland valley fifteen miles from Le Puy, I spent about a month of fine days. Monastier is notable for the making of lace, for drunkenness, for freedom of language, and for unparalleled political dissension. There are adherents of each of the four French parties - Legitimists, Orleanists, Imperialists, and Republicans - in this little mountain-town; and they all hate, loathe, decry, and calumniate each other. Except for business purposes, or to give each other the lie in a tavern brawl, they have laid aside even the civility of speech. 'Tis a mere mountain Poland. In the midst of this Babylon I found myself a rallying- point; every one was anxious to be kind and helpful to the stranger. This was not merely from the natural hospitality of mountain people, nor even from the surprise with which I was regarded as a man living of his own free will in Le Monastier, when he might just as well have lived anywhere else in this big world; it arose a good deal from my projected excursion southward through the Cevennes. A traveller of my sort was a thing hitherto unheard of in that district. I was looked upon with contempt, like a man who should project a journey to the moon, but yet with a respectful interest, like one setting forth for the inclement Pole. All were ready to help in my preparations; a crowd of sympathisers supported me at the critical moment of a bargain; not a step was taken but was heralded by glasses round and celebrated by a dinner or a breakfast.