Createdness and Ethics

Author: Hans Schaeffer
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 3110190737
Release Date: 2006
Genre: Religion

This book contains a systematic description of the theologies of Colin E. Gunton (1941?2003) and Oswald Bayer (b. 1939). Their use of the doctrine of creation in systematic theology has remarkable consequences for late-modern theological ethics. This book explores those consequences from the example of the theological doctrine of marriage. The author also contributes to the ecumenical debate by building on the Neo-Calvinist theological heritage.

Mathematics Methods for Elementary and Middle School Teachers

Author: Mary M. Hatfield
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Incorporated
ISBN: 0470136294
Release Date: 2007-11-02
Genre: Mathematics

Always on the cutting-edge of mathematics teaching, the new Sixth Edition continues to integrate technology with hands-on experience and the latest research and standards. The CD packaged with this book features videos with guiding questions to analyze real teacher-student interaction in the hard-to-teach math concepts. It also includes colored patterns to download that will help readers practice hands-on manipulations as they prepare for interactive test items.

America s Constitution

Author: Akhil Reed Amar
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 9781588364876
Release Date: 2012-02-29
Genre: History

In America’s Constitution, one of this era’s most accomplished constitutional law scholars, Akhil Reed Amar, gives the first comprehensive account of one of the world’s great political texts. Incisive, entertaining, and occasionally controversial, this “biography” of America’s framing document explains not only what the Constitution says but also why the Constitution says it. We all know this much: the Constitution is neither immutable nor perfect. Amar shows us how the story of this one relatively compact document reflects the story of America more generally. (For example, much of the Constitution, including the glorious-sounding “We the People,” was lifted from existing American legal texts, including early state constitutions.) In short, the Constitution was as much a product of its environment as it was a product of its individual creators’ inspired genius. Despite the Constitution’s flaws, its role in guiding our republic has been nothing short of amazing. Skillfully placing the document in the context of late-eighteenth-century American politics, America’s Constitution explains, for instance, whether there is anything in the Constitution that is unamendable; the reason America adopted an electoral college; why a president must be at least thirty-five years old; and why–for now, at least–only those citizens who were born under the American flag can become president. From his unique perspective, Amar also gives us unconventional wisdom about the Constitution and its significance throughout the nation’s history. For one thing, we see that the Constitution has been far more democratic than is conventionally understood. Even though the document was drafted by white landholders, a remarkably large number of citizens (by the standards of 1787) were allowed to vote up or down on it, and the document’s later amendments eventually extended the vote to virtually all Americans. We also learn that the Founders’ Constitution was far more slavocratic than many would acknowledge: the “three fifths” clause gave the South extra political clout for every slave it owned or acquired. As a result, slaveholding Virginians held the presidency all but four of the Republic’s first thirty-six years, and proslavery forces eventually came to dominate much of the federal government prior to Lincoln’s election. Ambitious, even-handed, eminently accessible, and often surprising, America’s Constitution is an indispensable work, bound to become a standard reference for any student of history and all citizens of the United States.

The Supreme Court

Author: Lawrence Baum
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 9781544361215
Release Date: 2018-09-12
Genre: Political Science

Connecting recent events to their effects on the courts, policy, and society, the Thirteenth Edition of The Supreme Court provides a brief yet comprehensive introduction to the U.S. Supreme Court. In successive chapters, the book examines major aspects of the Court, including the selection, backgrounds, and departures of justices; the creation of the Court's agenda; the decision-making process and the factors that shape the Court's decisions; the substance of the Court's policies; and the Court's impact on government and American society. Delving deeply into personalities and procedures, author Lawrence Baum provides a balanced explanation of the Court’s actions and the behavior of its justices as he reveals its complexity, reach, and influence. Updated with the most recent data displayed in a lively photo program, the new edition of this bestseller is one of the most engaging books on this subject available.