American Capitalism

Author: Louis Hyman
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781501171307
Release Date: 2017-05-23
Genre: Business & Economics

From Cornell University Professors Louis Hyman and Edward E. Baptist, a collection of the most relevant readings on the history of capitalism in America, created to accompany their EdX course "American Capitalism: A Reader." To understand the past and especially our own times, arguably no story is as essential to get right as the history of capitalism. Nearly all of our theories about promoting progress come from how we interpret the economic changes of the last 500 years. This past decade's crises continue to remind us just how much capitalism changes, even as basic features like wage labor, financial markets, private property, and entrepreneurs endure. While capitalism has a global history, the United States plays a special role in that story. "American Capitalism: A Reader" will help you to understand how the United States became the world's leading economic power, while revealing essential lessons about what has been and what will be possible in capitalism's ongoing revolution. Combining a wealth of essential readings, introductions by Professors Baptist and Hyman, and questions to help guide readers through the materials and broader subject, this course reader will prepare students to think critically about the history of capitalism in America.

Creating an Old South

Author: Edward E. Baptist
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807860038
Release Date: 2003-04-03
Genre: History

Set on the antebellum southern frontier, this book uses the history of two counties in Florida's panhandle to tell the story of the migrations, disruptions, and settlements that made the plantation South. Soon after the United States acquired Florida from Spain in 1821, migrants from older southern states began settling the land that became Jackson and Leon Counties. Slaves, torn from family and community, were forced to carve plantations from the woods of Middle Florida, while planters and less wealthy white men battled over the social, political, and economic institutions of their new society. Conflict between white men became full-scale crisis in the 1840s, but when sectional conflict seemed to threaten slavery, the whites of Middle Florida found common ground. In politics and everyday encounters, they enshrined the ideal of white male equality--and black inequality. To mask their painful memories of crisis, the planter elite told themselves that their society had been transplanted from older states without conflict. But this myth of an "Old," changeless South only papered over the struggles that transformed slave society in the course of its expansion. In fact, that myth continues to shroud from our view the plantation frontier, the very engine of conflict that had led to the myth's creation.

The Half Has Never Been Told

Author: Edward E. Baptist
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 9780465097685
Release Date: 2016-10-25
Genre: History

Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution—the nation's original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America's later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy. As historian Edward Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Until the Civil War, Baptist explains, the most important American economic innovations were ways to make slavery ever more profitable. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from enslaved African Americans. Thus the United States seized control of the world market for cotton, the key raw material of the Industrial Revolution, and became a wealthy nation with global influence. Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history. It forces readers to reckon with the violence at the root of American supremacy, but also with the survival and resistance that brought about slavery's end—and created a culture that sustains America's deepest dreams of freedom.

New Studies in the History of American Slavery

Author: Edward E. Baptist
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820326941
Release Date: 2006
Genre: History

These essays, by some of the most prominent young historians writing about slavery, fill gaps in our understanding of such subjects as enslaved women, the Atlantic and internal slave trades, the relationships between Indians and enslaved people, and enslavement in Latin America. Inventive and stimulating, the essays model the blending of methods and styles that characterizes the new cultural history of slavery’s social, political, and economic systems. Several common themes emerge from the volume, among them the correlation between race and identity; the meanings contained in family and community relationships, gender, and life’s commonplaces; and the literary and legal representations that legitimated and codified enslavement and difference. Such themes signal methodological and pedagogical shifts in the field away from master/slave or white/black race relations models toward perspectives that give us deeper access to the mental universe of slavery. Topics of the essays range widely, including European ideas about the reproductive capacities of African women and the process of making race in the Atlantic world, the contradictions of the assimilation of enslaved African American runaways into Creek communities, the consequences and meanings of death to Jamaican slaves and slave owners, and the tensions between midwifery as a black cultural and spiritual institution and slave midwives as health workers in a plantation economy. Opening our eyes to the personal, the contentious, and even the intimate, these essays call for a history in which both enslaved and enslavers acted in a vast human drama of bondage and freedom, salvation and damnation, wealth and exploitation.

Removing the Stain of Racism from the Southern Baptist Convention

Author: Kevin Jones
Publisher: B&H Publishing Group
ISBN: 9781433643354
Release Date: 2017-06-01
Genre: Religion

The Southern Baptist Convention (SBC) has a historical stain. The SBC once affirmed slavery and openly opposed and condemned abolitionists. Even though the convention repented of this sin publicly, a profound divide between the white majority and the black and brown minority still exists for many churches. This stain is more than historical fact; it prohibits Southern Baptist churches from embracing the one new man in Christ promised in Ephesians 2:11–22 and from participating in the new song of the saints from every tongue, tribe, people, and nation in Revelation 5:9. The glorious gospel of Jesus Christ commands all his followers to do our part in removing racism from our midst. Removing the Stain of Racism from the Southern Baptist Convention is a powerful and practical call to sacrifice, humility, and perseverance—along with a relentless commitment to Christian unity—for the sake of the gospel and our brothers and sisters in Christ.

Deliver Us from Evil

Author: Lacy K. Ford
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199751080
Release Date: 2009-09-03
Genre: History

A major contribution to our understanding of slavery in the early republic, Deliver Us from Evil illuminates the white South's twisted and tortured efforts to justify slavery, focusing on the period from the drafting of the federal constitution in 1787 through the age of Jackson. Drawing heavily on primary sources, including newspapers, government documents, legislative records, pamphlets, and speeches, Lacy K. Ford recaptures the varied and sometimes contradictory ideas and attitudes held by groups of white southerners as they tried to square slavery with their democratic ideals. He excels at conveying the political, intellectual, economic, and social thought of leading white southerners, vividly recreating the mental world of the varied actors and capturing the vigorous debates over slavery. He also shows that there was not one antebellum South but many, and not one southern white mindset but several, with the debates over slavery in the upper South quite different in substance from those in the deep South. In the upper South, where tobacco had fallen into comparative decline by 1800, debate often centered on how the area might reduce its dependence on slave labor and "whiten" itself, whether through gradual emancipation and colonization or the sale of slaves to the cotton South. During the same years, the lower South swirled into the vortex of the "cotton revolution," and that area's whites lost all interest in emancipation, no matter how gradual or fully compensated. An ambitious, thought-provoking, and highly insightful book, Deliver Us from Evil makes an important contribution to the history of slavery in the United States, shedding needed light on the white South's early struggle to reconcile slavery with its Revolutionary heritage.

Corporate Spirit

Author: Amanda Porterfield
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199372652
Release Date: 2018
Genre: History

In this groundbreaking work, Amanda Porterfield explores the intertwining of commercial and religious forces in the history of incorporation in the US. She focuses on three elements - the revolutionary implications of religious disestablishment, the proliferation of religious organizations,and religious organizations as models of commercial operation.The intersection of the religious and the corporate can be traced to first century Rome, and Paul's letters to Christian Jews in Corinth. "For just as the body is one and has many members, and all the members of the body, though many are one body, so is it with Christ." Porterfield traces thisconnection from ancient Rome, through medieval Europe and Elizabethan England. In the second half of the book, she reaches North America and considers Christian corporate fellowship in the years preceding the American Revolution. In the decades following ratification of the US Constitution, religious organizations led the way as models of corporate growth. Eighteenth-century economic and political developments forced American churches to back away from oversight of commercial operations and concentrate more on the formationof individual character, encouraging individuals to transfer to business the lessons of moral responsibility and common purpose learned in church. While commercial outlets faced daunting headwinds as a result of spiraling debt, weak banks, lack of financial regulation, rampant speculation,widespread counterfeiting, and ruinous embargoes, religious organizations set a fast pace of growth and helped many Americans absorb the shocks of economic turbulence by maintaining networks of social support. The privatization of religion enabled advocates for religion to operate more independently and creatively than under religious establishment; this independence fostered innovation, competition, and organizational growth. Left more to their own devices than under British law, religious groups inearly nineteenth-century America enjoyed new freedom as private corporations. This unprecedented autonomy facilitated religious growth and transformation on a massive scale, as religious groups devised new forms of communal governance and discipline, and new means of broadcasting their messagesthrough education, print media technology, public events, and ingenious event-planning. The book's conclusion presents an overview of the development of modern corporations since the late-nineteenth century, highlighting religion's evolution in a society dominated by commercial incorporation.

Enslaved Women in America An Encyclopedia

Author: Daina Ramey Berry Ph.D.
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780313349096
Release Date: 2012-06-12
Genre: Social Science

This singular reference provides an authoritative account of the daily lives of enslaved women in the United States, from colonial times to emancipation following the Civil War. Through essays, photos, and primary source documents, the female experience is explored, and women are depicted as central, rather than marginal, figures in history. • Dozens of photos of former enslaved women • Detailed historical timeline • Numerous rare primary documents, including runaway slave advertisements and even a plantation recipe for turtle soup • Profiles of noted female slaves and their works

North Carolinians in the Era of the Civil War and Reconstruction

Author: Paul D. Escott
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9780807837269
Release Date: 2012-09-01
Genre: History

Although North Carolina was a "home front" state rather than a battlefield state for most of the Civil War, it was heavily involved in the Confederate war effort and experienced many conflicts as a result. North Carolinians were divided over the issue of secession, and changes in race and gender relations brought new controversy. Blacks fought for freedom, women sought greater independence, and their aspirations for change stimulated fierce resistance from more privileged groups. Republicans and Democrats fought over power during Reconstruction and for decades thereafter disagreed over the meaning of the war and Reconstruction. With contributions by well-known historians as well as talented younger scholars, this volume offers new insights into all the key issues of the Civil War era that played out in pronounced ways in the Tar Heel State. In nine essays composed specifically for this volume, contributors address themes such as ambivalent whites, freed blacks, the political establishment, racial hopes and fears, postwar ideology, and North Carolina women. These issues of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras were so powerful that they continue to agitate North Carolinians today. Contributors: David Brown, Manchester University Judkin Browning, Appalachian State University Laura F. Edwards, Duke University Paul D. Escott, Wake Forest University John C. Inscoe, University of Georgia Chandra Manning, Georgetown University Barton A. Myers, University of Georgia Steven E. Nash, University of Georgia Paul Yandle, West Virginia University Karin Zipf, East Carolina University

Die stumme Patientin

Author: Alex Michaelides
Publisher: Droemer eBook
ISBN: 9783426453964
Release Date: 2019-05-02
Genre: Fiction

Der internationale Spannungs-Bestseller des Jahres 2019. „Ein seltenes Juwel: der perfekte Thriller. Dieser außergewöhnliche Roman hat mein Blut zum Kochen gebracht." A.J. Finn ( #1-New-York-Times-Bestsellerautor von "The Woman in the Window") Einen exzellenten, psychologischen Thriller hat der Brite Alex Michaelides, hoch erfolgreicher Drehbuchautor von "The devil you know", mit "Die stumme Patientin" geschrieben. Eine internationale Spannungs-Entdeckung, die Fans von "The woman in the window" oder "Gone girl" elektrisieren und überraschen wird. Hochkarätige Thriller-Autoren wie A.J. Finn, David Baldacci, Lee Child, Joanne Harris und Black Crouch sind sich sicher: hier kommt DIE Thriller-Entdeckung des Jahres 2019. Blutüberströmt hat man die Malerin Alicia Berenson neben ihrem geliebten Ehemann gefunden – dem sie fünf Mal in den Kopf geschossen hat. Seit sieben Jahren sitzt die Malerin nun in einer geschlossenen psychiatrischen Anstalt. Und schweigt. Kein Wort hat sie seit der Nacht des Mordes verloren, lediglich ein Bild gemalt: Es zeigt sie selbst als Alkestis, die in der griechischen Mythologie ihr Leben gibt, um ihren Mann vor dem Tod zu bewahren. Fasziniert von ihrem Fall, setzt der forensische Psychiater Theo Faber alles daran, Alicia zum Sprechen zu bringen. Doch will der Psychiater wirklich nur herausfinden, was in jener Nacht geschehen ist? "Ein exzellenter, psychologischer Thriller: Elegant, clever und mit einer Wendung, die mich komplett überrascht hat (und um mich zu überraschen, braucht es eine Menge!) Hut ab vor Alex Michaelides. Bitte mehr!" JOANNE HARRIS "Absolut brilliant ... "Die stumme Patientin" hat mir aufregende, atemlose und intensive Lesestunden gebracht - wobei ich das Ende nie vorhersehen konnte - nicht eine Sekunde lang." STEPHEN FRY „Intelligentes, durchdachtes Storytelling plus Hochspannung – ein hervorragender Roman in jeglicher Hinsicht.” LEE CHILD

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Author: Thomas C. Holt
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9781469607245
Release Date: 2013-06-03
Genre: Reference

There is no denying that race is a critical issue in understanding the South. However, this concluding volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture challenges previous understandings, revealing the region's rich, ever-expanding diversity and providing new explorations of race relations. In 36 thematic and 29 topical essays, contributors examine such subjects as the Tuskegee Syphilis Study, Japanese American incarceration in the South, relations between African Americans and Native Americans, Chinese men adopting Mexican identities, Latino religious practices, and Vietnamese life in the region. Together the essays paint a nuanced portrait of how concepts of race in the South have influenced its history, art, politics, and culture beyond the familiar binary of black and white.

Money Over Mastery Family Over Freedom

Author: Calvin Schermerhorn
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9781421400365
Release Date: 2011-05-09
Genre: History

Traces the story of how slaves seized opportunities that emerged from North Carolina's pre-Civil War modernization and economic diversification to protect their families from being sold, revealing the integral role played by empowered African-American families in regional antebellum economics and politics. Simultaneous.

Journal of the Civil War Era

Author: William A. Blair
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 9780807852668
Release Date: 2012-12-01
Genre: History

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 2, Number 4 December 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Articles Mark Fleszar "My Laborers in Haiti are not Slaves": Proslavery Fictions and a Black Colonization Experiment on the Northern Coast, 1835-1846 Jarret Ruminski "Tradyville": The Contraband Trade and the Problem of Loyalty in Civil War Mississippi K. Stephen Prince Legitimacy and Interventionism: Northern Republicans, the "Terrible Carpetbagger," and the Retreat from Reconstruction Review Essay Roseanne Currarino Toward a History of Cultural Economy Professional Notes T. Lloyd Benson Geohistory: Democratizing the Landscape of Battle Book Reviews Books Received Notes on Contributors The Journal of the Civil War Era takes advantage of the flowering of research on the many issues raised by the sectional crisis, war, Reconstruction, and memory of the conflict, while bringing fresh understanding to the struggles that defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the nineteenth century.

Rebels and Runaways

Author: Larry E. Rivers
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252036910
Release Date: 2012
Genre: History

This gripping study examines slave resistance and protest in antebellum Florida and its local and national impact from 1821 to 1865. Using a variety of sources such as slaveholders' wills and probate records, ledgers, account books, court records, oral histories, and numerous newspaper accounts, Larry Eugene Rivers discusses Florida's unique historical significance as a runaway slave haven dating back to the seventeenth century. In moving detail, Rivers illustrates what life was like for enslaved blacks whose families were pulled asunder as they relocated from the Upper South to the Lower South and how they fought back any way they could to control small parts of their own lives. Against a smouldering backdrop of violence, this study analyzes the various degrees of slave resistance--from the perspectives of both slave and master--and how they differed in various regions of antebellum Florida. Identifying more commonly known slave rebellions such as the Stono, Louisiana, Denmark (Telemaque) Vesey, Gabriel, and the Nat Turner insurrections, Rivers argues persuasively that the size, scope, and intensity of black resistance in the Second Seminole War makes it the largest sustained slave insurrection ever to occur in American history.