Citizen 13660

Author:
Publisher: Classics of Asian American Lit
ISBN: 0295993545
Release Date: 2014
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Mine Okubo was one of more than a hundred thousand people of Japanese descent - nearly two-thirds of whom were American citizens - who were forced into "protective custody" shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Citizen 13660, Okubo's illustrated memoir of life in relocation centers in California and Utah, illuminates this experience with poignant drawings and witty, candid text. This classic in Asian American literature and American history, with a new introduction by Christine Hong, is available for the first time in both a traditional paperback format and an artist's edition, oversize and in hardcover to better illustrate the innovative artwork as originally envisioned by Okubo. "[Mine Okubo] took her months of life in the concentration camp and made it the material for this amusing, heartbreaking book. . . . The moral is never expressed, but the wry pictures and the scanty words make the reader laugh - and if he is an American too - blush." - Pearl Buck "A remarkably objective and vivid and even humorous account. . . . In dramatic and detailed drawings and brief text, [Okubo] documents the whole episode . . . all that she saw, objectively, yet with a warmth of understanding." - New York Times Book Review

Japanese American Internment during World War II A History and Reference Guide

Author: Wendy Ng
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9780313096556
Release Date: 2001-12-30
Genre: Social Science

The internment of thousands of Japanese Americans during World War II is one of the most shameful episodes in American history. This history and reference guide will help students and other interested readers to understand the history of this action and its reinterpretation in recent years, but it will also help readers to understand the Japanese American wartime experience through the words of those who were interned. Why did the U.S. government take this extraordinary action? How was the evacuation and resettlement handled? How did Japanese Americans feel on being asked to leave their homes and live in what amounted to concentration camps? How did they respond, and did they resist? What developments have taken place in the last twenty years that have reevaluated this wartime action? A variety of materials is provided to assist readers in understanding the internment experience. Six interpretive essays examine key aspects of the event and provide new interpretations based on the most recent scholarship. Essays include: - A short narrative history of the Japanese in America before World War II - The evacuation - Life within barbed wire-the assembly and relocation centers - The question of loyalty-Japanese Americans in the military and draft resisters - Legal challenges to the evacuation and internment - After the war-resettlement and redress A chronology of events, 26 biographical profiles of important figures, the text of 10 key primary documents--from Executive Order 9066, which authorized the internment camps, to first-person accounts of the internment experience--a glossary of terms, and an annotative bibliography of recommended print sources and web sites provide ready reference value. Every library should update its resources on World War II with this history and reference guide.

The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Asian American Literature 3 volumes

Author: Guiyou Huang
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 9781567207361
Release Date: 2008-12-30
Genre: Literary Criticism

Asian American literature dates back to the close of the 19th century, and during the years following World War II it significantly expanded in volume and diversity. Monumental in scope, this encyclopedia surveys Asian American literature from its origins through 2007. Included are more than 270 alphabetically arranged entries on writers, major works, significant historical events, and important terms and concepts. Thus the encyclopedia gives special attention to the historical, social, cultural, and legal contexts surrounding Asian American literature and central to the Asian American experience. Each entry is written by an expert contributor and cites works for further reading, and the encyclopedia closes with a selected, general bibliography of essential print and electronic resources. While literature students will value this encyclopedia as a guide to writings by Asian Americans, the encyclopedia also supports the social studies curriculum by helping students use literature to learn about Asian American history and culture, as it pertains to writers from a host of Asian ethnic and cultural backgrounds, including Afghans, Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, Iranians, Indians, Vietnamese, Hawaiians, and other Asian Pacific Islanders. The encyclopedia supports the literature curriculum by helping students learn more about Asian American literature. In addition, it supports the social studies curriculum by helping students learn about the Asian American historical and cultural experience.

No No Boy

Author: John Okada
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295806006
Release Date: 2014-11-01
Genre: Fiction

"No-No Boy has the honor of being among the first of what has become an entire literary canon of Asian American literature,” writes novelist Ruth Ozeki in her new foreword. First published in 1957, No-No Boy was virtually ignored by a public eager to put World War II and the Japanese internment behind them. It was not until the mid-1970s that a new generation of Japanese American writers and scholars recognized the novel’s importance and popularized it as one of literature’s most powerful testaments to the Asian American experience. No-No Boy tells the story of Ichiro Yamada, a fictional version of the real-life “no-no boys.” Yamada answered “no” twice in a compulsory government questionnaire as to whether he would serve in the armed forces and swear loyalty to the United States. Unwilling to pledge himself to the country that interned him and his family, Ichiro earns two years in prison and the hostility of his family and community when he returns home to Seattle. As Ozeki writes, Ichiro’s “obsessive, tormented” voice subverts Japanese postwar “model-minority” stereotypes, showing a fractured community and one man’s “threnody of guilt, rage, and blame as he tries to negotiate his reentry into a shattered world.” The first edition of No-No Boy since 1979 presents this important work to new generations of readers.

A Companion to American Literature and Culture

Author: Paul Lauter
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444320637
Release Date: 2010-02-12
Genre: Literary Criticism

This expansive Companion offers a set of fresh perspectives on the wealth of texts produced in and around what is now the United States. * Highlights the diverse voices that constitute American literature, embracing oral traditions, slave narratives, regional writing, literature of the environment, and more * Demonstrates that American literature was multicultural before Europeans arrived on the continent, and even more so thereafter * Offers three distinct paradigms for thinking about American literature, focusing on: genealogies of American literary study; writers and issues; and contemporary theories and practices * Enables students and researchers to generate richer, more varied and more comprehensive readings of American literature

In Gesellschaft kleiner Bomben

Author: Karan Mahajan
Publisher: CulturBooks
ISBN: 9783959880862
Release Date: 2017-07-15
Genre: Fiction

Auf der Litrom-Bestenliste »Weltempfänger« Winter 2017/18 »Eins der 25 wichtigsten Bücher der Saison.« Spiegel-Online »Eins der 10 besten Bücher des Jahres.« New York Times Das Buch Die Khurana-Brüder schlendern zusammen mit ihrem Schulkameraden Mansoor Ahmed über einen gut besuchten Markt in Delhi. Ohne Vorwarnung kommt es zur Katastrophe: Neben ihnen explodiert eine Bombe – eine der vielen »kleinen« Bomben, die von der Welt kaum beachtet werden – und reißt die Khurana-Brüder in den Tod. Mansoor überlebt, doch der Bombenanschlag hinterlässt Spuren an Körper und Seele. Nach einem kurzen Aufenthalt an einer amerikanischen Universität kehrt Mansoor nach Delhi zurück, wo seine Suche nach einem Platz im Leben immer radikalere Formen annimmt ... Eng verwoben mit der Geschichte der Familien Khurana und Ahmed ist die des kaschmirischen Bombenbauers Shockie, der bereit ist, sein Leben für die Unabhängigkeit seines Vaterlands zu opfern. Karan Mahajans Roman ist außergewöhnlich komponiert: Er beginnt buchstäblich mit dem großen Knall – und zeichnet dann die vielen Druckwellen nach, die die Bombenexplosion bei allen Beteiligten ausgelöst hat: Welche Auswirkungen hat ein solcher Terrorakt auf die Betroffenen? Auf die Angehörigen? Auf die Gesellschaft? Wie werden Menschen zu Terroristen? Mahajan nähert sich differenziert, originell und nicht ohne Humor einigen der wichtigsten Fragen unserer Zeit. Warum es uns gefällt Karan Mahajan schreibt lebendig und originell über die Auswirkungen des Terrorismus auf Opfer und Täter. Einer der relevantesten literarischen Beiträge zu einem der wichtigsten Themen unserer Zeit. Pressestimmen Deutschland (Auswahl) »Schonungslos und voller Mitgefühl porträtiert Karan Mahajan einen Bombenanschlag in Delhi ... Der Autor zeichnet seine Bilder mit enormer sprachlicher Präzision und scharfsinnigem Witz.» Jana Volkmann, Buchkultur »Karan Mahajans Roman ist sprachgewaltig, aufwühlend und spannend ...« Jörg E. Mayer, Deutschlandfunk »Mahajan stellt einen Link her zwischen allen, die mit so einem Anschlag zu tun haben. Die Wirkung ist erstaunlich: Der Terror verliert Glanz und Gloria seines demonstrativen Nihilismus, er steht nackt da und stumm in seiner ganzen Erbärmlichkeit – sein Schrecken verpufft.« Ulrich Noller, WDR »Eine bestechende Erkundung über die Natur der Bombe ... « Claudia Kramatschek, NZZ »Karan Mahajan erzählt bewundernswert real von den Auswirkungen eines Anschlags aus Sicht von Opfern und Tätern.« NDR