Citizen 13660

Author:
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295959894
Release Date: 1946
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Drawings with brief comments by the author describe her memories of life in a California internment camp during World War II

No No Boy

Author: John Okada
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295806006
Release Date: 2014-11-01
Genre: Fiction

"No-No Boy has the honor of being the very first Japanese American novel,� writes novelist Ruth Ozeki in her new foreword to John Okada�s classic of Asian American literature. First published in 1956, No-No Boy was virtually ignored by a public eager to put World War II and the Japanese internment behind them. It was not until the mid-1970s that a new generation of Japanese American writers and scholars recognized the novel�s importance and popularized it as one of literature�s most powerful testaments to the Asian American experience. No-No Boy tells the story of Ichiro Yamada, a fictional version of the real-life �no-no boys.� Yamada answered �no� twice in a compulsory government questionnaire as to whether he would serve in the armed forces and swear loyalty to the United States. Unwilling to pledge himself to the country that interned him and his family, Ichiro earns two years in prison and the hostility of his family and community when he returns home to Seattle. As Ozeki writes, Ichiro�s �obsessive, tormented� voice subverts Japanese postwar �model-minority� stereotypes, showing a fractured community and one man�s �threnody of guilt, rage, and blame as he tries to negotiate his reentry into a shattered world.� The first edition of No-No Boy since 1979 presents this important work to new generations of readers. Replaces ISBN 9780295955254

Moving Images

Author: Jasmine Alinder
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252033988
Release Date: 2009-01-01
Genre: History

When the American government began impounding Japanese American citizens after Pearl Harbor, photography became a battleground. The control of the means of representation affected nearly every aspect of the incarceration, from the mug shots criminalizing Japanese Americans to the prohibition of cameras in the hands of inmates. The government also hired photographers to make an extensive record of the forced removal and incarceration. In this insightful study, Jasmine Alinder explores the photographic record of the imprisonment in war relocation centers such as Manzanar, Tule Lake, Jerome, and others. She investigates why photographs were made, how they were meant to function, and how they have been reproduced and interpreted subsequently by the popular press and museums in constructing versions of public history. Alinder provides calibrated readings of the photographs from this period, including works by Dorothea Lange, Ansel Adams, Manzanar camp inmate Toyo Miyatake (who constructed his own camera to document the complicated realities of camp life), and contemporary artists Patrick Nagatani and Masumi Hayashi. Illustrated with more than forty photographs, Moving Images reveals the significance of the camera in the process of incarceration as well as the construction of race, citizenship, and patriotism in this complex historical moment.

Yokohama California

Author: Toshio Mori
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295806426
Release Date: 2015-03-22
Genre: Fiction

Yokohama, California, originally released in 1949, is the first published collection of short stories by a Japanese American. Set in a fictional community, these linked stories are alive with the people, gossip, humor, and legends of Japanese America in the 1930s and 1940s.

Fighting for Life

Author: S. Josephine Baker
Publisher: New York Review of Books
ISBN: 9781590177068
Release Date: 2013
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

"New York's lower east side was said to be the most densely populated square mile on the face of the earth in the 1890s. City health inspectors called the neighborhood "the suicide ward" and referred to one particular tenement--in an official Health Department report, no less--as an "out and out hog pen." Diarrhea epidemics raged each summer, killing thousands of city children. Sweatshop babies with smallpox and typhus dozed in garment heaps destined for fashionable Broadway shops. Desperate mothers paced the streets to soothe their feverish children, and white mourning cloths hung from every building. A third of children living in the slums died before their fifth birthday. By 1911, the child death rate had fallen sharply and The New York Times hailed the city as the healthiest on earth. In this witty and highly personal autobiography, public health crusader Dr. Sara Josephine Baker explains how this remarkable transformation was achieved. By the time she retired from the New York City Health Department in 1923, Baker was famous worldwide for saving the lives of 90,000 children. The public health programs Baker developed, many still in use today, have probably saved the lives of millions more. She also fought for women's suffrage, toured Russia in the 1930s, and captured "Typhoid" Mary Malone, twice. She was also an astute observer of her times, and Fighting for Life is one of the most honest, compassionate memoirs of American medicine ever written"--Provided by publisher.

Rediscovering America

Author: Peter Duus
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520950375
Release Date: 2011-09-01
Genre: History

In this extraordinary collection of writings, covering the period from 1878 to 1989, a wide range of Japanese visitors to the United States offer their vivid, and sometimes surprising perspectives on Americans and American society. Peter Duus and Kenji Hasegawa have selected essays and articles by Japanese from many walks of life: writers and academics, bureaucrats and priests, politicians and journalists, businessmen, philanthropists, artists. Their views often reflect power relations between America and Japan, particularly during the wartime and postwar periods, but all of them dealt with common themes—America’s origins, its ethnic diversity, its social conformity, its peculiar gender relations, its vast wealth, and its cultural arrogance—making clear that while Japanese observers often regarded the U.S. as a mentor, they rarely saw it as a role model.

Topaz Moon

Author: Kimi Kodani Hill
Publisher: Heyday
ISBN: UOM:39015050283921
Release Date: 2000
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Presents the artist's sketches, sumi paintings, and watercolors depicting the austerity, hardship, hope, and beauty he discovered in the internment camp, and includes a collection of his interviews and correspondance.

Forbidden Family

Author: Margaret Sams
Publisher: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 0299121445
Release Date: 1997-09-01
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Written just five years after the end of World War II, this is Margaret Sams's moving testimony of life in a Japanese internment camp--the can of Spam hoarded for Christmas dinner, the clandestine radio hidden in her sewing kit, the beheading of other prisoners for transgressions. With her husband held elsewhere as a prisoner of war and with a small son to protect, Margaret broke the rules both of society and of her captors to fall in love and bear a child with a kind and daring fellow internee, Jerry Sams.

Multicultural Comics

Author: Frederick Luis Aldama
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 9780292739536
Release Date: 2010-09-15
Genre: Literary Criticism

Multicultural Comics: From Zap to Blue Beetle is the first comprehensive look at comic books by and about race and ethnicity. The thirteen essays tease out for the general reader the nuances of how such multicultural comics skillfully combine visual and verbal elements to tell richly compelling stories that gravitate around issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality within and outside the U.S. comic book industry. Among the explorations of mainstream and independent comic books are discussions of the work of Adrian Tomine, Grant Morrison, and Jessica Abel as well as Marv Wolfman and Gene Colan's The Tomb of Dracula; Native American Anishinaabe-related comics; mixed-media forms such as Kerry James Marshall's comic-book/community performance; DJ Spooky's visual remix of classic film; the role of comics in India; and race in the early Underground Comix movement. The collection includes a "one-stop shop" for multicultural comic book resources, such as archives, websites, and scholarly books. Each of the essays shows in a systematic, clear, and precise way how multicultural comic books work in and of themselves and also how they are interconnected with a worldwide tradition of comic-book storytelling.

Culture Shock and Japanese American Relations

Author: Sadao Asada
Publisher: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 9780826265692
Release Date: 2007-06
Genre: History

Ever since Commodore Perry sailed into Uraga Channel, relations between the United States and Japan have been characterized by culture shock. Now a distinguished Japanese historian critically analyzes contemporary thought, public opinion, and behavior in the two countries over the course of the twentieth century, offering a binational perspective on culture shock as it has affected their relations. In these essays, Sadao Asada examines the historical interaction between these two countries from 1890 to 2006, focusing on naval strategy, transpacific racism, and the atomic bomb controversy. For each topic, he offers a rigorous analysis of both American and Japanese perceptions, showing how cultural relations and the interchange of ideas have been complex--and occasionally destructive. Culture Shock and Japanese-American Relations contains insightful essays on the influence of Alfred Mahan on the Japanese navy and on American images of Japan during the 1920s. Other essays consider the progressive breakdown of relations between the two countries and the origins of the Pacific War from the viewpoint of the Japanese navy, then tackle the ultimate shock of the atomic bomb and Japan's surrender, tracing changing perceptions of the decision to use the bomb on both sides of the Pacific over the course of sixty years. In discussing these subjects, Asada draws on Japanese sources largely inaccessible to Western scholars to provide a host of eye-opening insights for non-Japanese readers. After studying in America for nine years and receiving degrees from both Carleton College and Yale University, Asada returned to Japan to face his own reverse culture shock. His insights raise important questions of why people on opposite sides of the Pacific see things differently and adapt their perceptions to different purposes. This book marks a major effort toward reconstructing and understanding the conflicted course of Japanese-American relations during the first half of the twentieth century.

Asian American Art

Author: Gordon H. Chang
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804757522
Release Date: 2008
Genre: Art

Presents a comprehensive study of the lives and artistic productions of Asian American artists from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Nisei Daughter

Author: Monica Itoi Sone
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295956887
Release Date: 1979
Genre: Biography & Autobiography

Tells the story of a Japanese-American woman growing up in Seattle in the 1930s who was subjected to relocation during World War II

New Keywords

Author: Tony Bennett
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9781118725412
Release Date: 2013-05-29
Genre: Social Science

Over 25 years ago, Raymond Williams’ Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society set the standard for how we understand and use the language of culture and society. Now, three luminaries in the field of cultural studies have assembled a volume that builds on and updates Williams’ classic, reflecting the transformation in culture and society since its publication. New Keywords: A Revised Vocabulary of Culture and Society is a state-of-the-art reference for students, teachers and culture vultures everywhere. Assembles a stellar team of internationally renowned and interdisciplinary social thinkers and theorists Showcases 142 signed entries – from art, commodity, and fundamentalism to youth, utopia, the virtual, and the West – that capture the practices, institutions, and debates of contemporary society Builds on and updates Raymond Williams’s classic Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society, by reflecting the transformation in culture and society over the last 25 years Includes a bibliographic resource to guide research and cross-referencing The book is supported by a website: www.blackwellpublishing.com/newkeywords.

Lament in the Night

Author: Shōson Nagahara
Publisher: Kaya
ISBN: 1885030487
Release Date: 2012
Genre: Fiction

A first English-language translation of two novellas by the early 20th-century Japanese author offers insight into the literary heritage of non-English-speaking immigrants in America and includes the 1925 title story, in which an itinerant day laborer prowls the back alleys of Los Angeles; and a second story in which an abandoned young mother works her way through bars and nightclubs. Original.

Desert Exile

Author: Yoshiko Uchida
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295806532
Release Date: 2015-10-29
Genre: Social Science

After the attack on Pearl Harbor, everything changed for Yoshiko Uchida. Desert Exile is her autobiographical account of life before and during World War II. The book does more than relate the day-to-day experience of living in stalls at the Tanforan Racetrack, the assembly center just south of San Francisco, and in the Topaz, Utah, internment camp. It tells the story of the courage and strength displayed by those who were interned. Replaces ISBN 9780295961903